Category Archives: Journal 24

Drop 2 in cafes and on benches

Drop 2 in cafes and on benches

This morning I wanted to revist the three places where I’d met most of the Inscribers. So I headed back into The Moat and Mr Tulk cafes, which flank either side of the State Library of Victoria, which just happens to be third on the list of meeting places. Journal 5′s Inscriber wanted to do the drop with me, in a place that related to their Inscription and experience, so we met on the steps and did the drop together.

Journal 24

Journal 24

Journal 5

Journal 5

Journal 12

Journal 12

Journal 24 and Journal 1 hand backs

Journal 24 and Journal 1 hand backs
Journal 24

Journal 24

Yesterday I settled into a comfy chair at The Moat cafe for 3 back to back meetings with Inscribers. First up was Journal 24′s Inscriber. We chatted about the difficulties of naming pets and various ways to organise your books at home. This Inscriber for a while had them all arranged by colour, which meant that occasionally they went to op shops looking for 50c books with the right spine colour to enhance the overall visual of their library. Nowadays, this Inscriber organises it by which writers might have been friends with which other writers, assuming they’d all been alive and in the same pub at the same time. I like to organise mine by subject and then height, tallest closest to the edge and sloping down to the middle, which means I can stick more stuff on top of the books. My shelves are rather cluttered,  there’s a lot of tiny art and sculptures which live all through out and inbetween (and on top of) the books.

Journal 1

Journal 1

Next, I received a flying visit from Journal 1′s Inscriber. This Inscriber took their Journal on a world wide adventure with them, Journal 1 has been to around 5 different countries! This Inscriber was heading off to do something they’d always wanted to do, but they were running late for it, so with promises of coffees next time, they had to scarper!

So now, Journal 24 and Journal 1 are ready to go out and be found by someone in the Melbourne CBD next week…

Ink and Spindle

Ink and Spindle

Today I also wanted to highlight Ink and Spindle, the local screenprinting business that is responsible for the amazing material that make the unique Sharing Ink Journals covers.

Ink and Spindle owners Lara Cameron & Tegan Rose

Ink and Spindle owners Lara Cameron & Tegan Rose

Apart from their beautiful range of prints and their commitment to ethically produced and eco-friendly materials, Lara and Tegan are great believers in community and local artists. When I contacted them about the possibility of being part of Sharing Ink, they leapt at the chance to participate in a local art project.

Ink and Spindle's printing table

Ink and Spindle’s printing table

This is Ink and Spindle’s 10 metre table, where they print all their distinctive and amazing fabrics. If you look closely at this photo, you might recognize the pattern, it can be seen (wholly or partly) on Journal 12, Journal 27, Journal 24, Journal 28, Journal 29, Journal 21, Journal 13, Journal 2, Journal 15, Journal 9 and Journal 10. But as you look on the Journals, you’ll notice the layers and layers of other patterns overprinted across the material. This is because the Sharing ink Journal material is actually material that Ink and Spindle lay down the protect their table from the screen printing process. This makes every Sharing Ink Journal unique, although there are patterns that appear again and again, it’s never the same collection of patterns on any inch of the material.

If you go to the Ink and Spindle website you’ll see all the patterns you’ve noticed on the Journals in all their glory.

I’d like to thank Ink and Spindle for their support, it is their material that gives this project it’s visual continuity and it is their generousness that has helped infuse the loveliness that is such a part of Sharing Ink.

Journal 9, Journal 23 and Journal 24 hand overs

Journal 9, Journal 23 and Journal 24 hand overs
Journal 9

Journal 9

This hand over was an adventure… It started with climbing a hill so steep that gum nuts dropping from every tree I passed rolled past my feet and away. I arrived at the house on the summit, which had a lovely gent who opened the door and a 7 foot monster sentry guarding the fridge. I met this Inscriber, who was still in their pajamas – robes fit for a sailor or pirate, and a crocheted wizard cape. We drank tea that didn’t taste of tea and milk that didn’t taste of milk, and we spoke of animals, newly discovered cellars and ancient wine presses, while birds dropped olives from the skies. This Inscriber proclaimed their love for the narwhal, who smiled gently at them from the cover of Journal 9.

 

 

 

 

Journal 23

Journal 23

Next, I traveled across town to meet the next Inscriber. We had agreed on a local hip cafe, worn wood and all day busy. The kitchen was releasing amazing smells, but we were here only for coffee. About an hour beforehand, this Inscriber had just had some good news publicly released, so throughout our conversation they were receiving texts, tweets and email congratulations, which was lovely. We spent some time chatting about Masters, PhDs and teaching, before I handed them Journal 23. Coffees finished, we said goodbye and the Inscriber pulled out their phone to see the whole screen filled with more messages! So nice!

 

 

 

 

Journal 24

Journal 24

The final hand over for the day was back in town, in the gold and red lush surroundings of a lush cafe. The waiters were lovely (although a little amused at my tired attempts at sentence structure) and I found that a lemon, lime and bitters works wonders to combat too many morning coffees. The Inscriber and I talked of poetry and PhDs and the ability of projects to clump together like shoals of fish.

Journal 24 has trams and bikes prominent on it’s cover, the Inscriber observed it’s a very Melbourne Journal!

A photographic update of the project

A photographic update of the project
Sharing Ink

Sharing Ink

And this is currently my desk. Although it looks chaotic there’s actually method in the madness. At the front is the final cover being glued, Journal 30.

Just behind that are two flat stacks of covers waiting to be sewn together with pages at the left, which are sorted into piles of 12 and folded (you can see Journal 24′s cover at the top of the front pile – this photo was taken about halfway through the day. The Journal on the top of the other pile hasn’t been sewn together yet, so doesn’t have a number).

Behind the covers are two piles of finished Journals, waiting to be given to Inscribers (Journals 5 and 9 are on the top of those piles).

At the left side around the middle of the frame are two of the Journals that have been handed back by the Inscribers and are now ready and waiting to go out. Journal 2 is at the front, behind that is Journal 11.

Phew! But I can’t wait until all the Journals are in the ‘ready to go out’ pile :)

Journal 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24

Journal 19, 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24

I’ve had two big days of sewing Journals, and I’m almost finished this part of the project, which is nice! I’m super keen to continue handing out the Journals to their Inscribers and getting them back, ready to put out on the streets in August. In the mean time, have a look at the newest batch…

Journal 19

Journal 19

Journal 19′s overprinted patterns work really well together

Journal 20

Journal 20

The orange ferns underneath the trams makes me wonder at this Journal’s story

Journal 21

Journal 21

I love the blank space at the top right hand corner of this Journal

Journal 22

Journal 22

The photo doesn’t do justice to the incredible vividness of the orange on this Journal’s cover

Journal 23

Journal 23

The white branches snake over this Journal back and front

Journal 24

Journal 24

I love the really subtle white keys on this journal (look closely!)